Projects

  • GNCF improving patient discharge (transfer) process  AWARD WINNING PROJECT
  • Focus on ‘Seldom Heard’ Groups
  • Improving our knowledge and skills
  • We are in it together – let’s make it work!

GNCF improving patient discharge (transfer) process

Patients have been telling us for a long time about their delayed hospital discharge. So in early 2015 we set up a project with Nottingham University Hospitals (NUH) to find out how long it was taking patients on the cancer wards to leave hospital once they were told that they were medically fit to go home.

The aim of the project was to interview cancer patients on the day of discharge and to follow up by telephone 1-2 weeks later to capture and record individual patient experiences of their discharge.

Before starting the project members of the GNCF hospital discharge sub-group were enrolled as NUH volunteers. This required each of us to undertake a half-day training session at NUH, followed by a DBS (Disclosure & Barring Service) check and interview, prior to receiving our NUH volunteer identification badges. Members also undertook a training session on active listening with the Samaritans to improve their interviewing skills. 38 patients have been interviewed and we are currently writing up a report to present to NUH.

This project recently won first prize in the Patient Identified Innovations category of the East Midlands Academic Health Science Network, Innovations in Health Care Awards 2015

Focus on ‘Seldom Heard’ Groups

Early in 2015 the GNCF received funding from the East Midland Academic Health Alliance (EMAHSN) to undertake focus groups with cancer patients from a number of Nottinghamshire’s ‘seldom heard’ communities.
Such communities may have difficulty accessing NHS cancer services due to physical difficulties, language barriers, cultural perceptions, traditions and social expectations. Focus meetings have been held with several groups.Further focus groups are planned

Improving our knowledge and skills

Four members undertook the accredited Macmillan Cancer Support Course. This comprised 4 x 3 day modules each covering different aspects: communications, counselling, bereavement and cancer care. 25 people attended the course: patients, carers and professionals. The knowledge and skills acquired on this course were invaluable for the work undertaken on the discharge project.

We are in it together – let’s make it work!

In November 2014 the GNCF invited Nottinghamshire’s cancer self help groups to a conference to share their experiences and knowledge. 42 patients/carers and 10 professionals attended. Two key NHS speakers outlined current cancer services both in hospital and the community. Other professionals from the NHS, social care and cancer charities manned market stalls. The conference was a great success and delegates said:

  • ‘We have been in need of this get together for a long time’.
  • ‘Annual meeting please. Invite some GPs and staff from doctors’ surgeries’.
  • ‘It’s put the word Forum back into GNCF’.